Sony 3d TVs

Sony’s strategy has been from an early point to encourage uptake of 3D not just by creating great 3D TVs but also great 3D content. Partnerships with the likes of Discovery and ESPN to create 3D content to be screened have tried to give the initial uptake of 3D a boost which otherwise would have been held back by a lack of much content beyond animated movies; with ESPN this included filming a variety of sports in 3D and broadcasting them. Sony of course create their own programming and used it to showcase 3D in the US early on, though they have recently launched a Sony channel in the UK which may be used for 3D programming in future.

Sony are one of the top makers of 3D cameras and became aware that the cost of these cameras would hold back the making of 3D content, part of the reason why 3D animation was initially much more popular than filmed content. Sony’s answer was to lend and rent out cameras to content makers as well as working to bring down the cost of cameras. Columbia though is part of the Sony family and Sony quickly ramped up the number of 3D movies made by Columbia using Sony 3D cameras:this includes films such as Men in Black 3 and Resident Evil Afterlife, which are live action movies that hit cinemas in 3D but shortly after come out on 3D Blu-Ray. It may well be that initially most 3D content will be films bought out in 3D on Blu Ray and Sony bundle films with 3D TVs so people have something to watch in 3D straight away.

Sony 3d TVs

Sony unlike other TV manufacturers is also able to leverage the advantage of having a games console as welland their Playstation 3 can be upgraded with firmware to allow it to run games in 3D with several titles available already.The Playstation 4 will have most if not all games in 3D though and turning a 3D rendered game into a 3D game is an easy enough process. Of course playstation users could buy other TV makes but many will have a loyalty to Sony already and there is the potential for bundling again. Continue reading “Sony 3d TVs”

Toshiba 3D TVs

Many reviewers and fans worry that Toshiba may have taken their eye off the ball in terms of developing and releasing Active Shutter TVs in order to focus on their Auto 3D televisions. Auto 3D  wont need glasses but should be viewable from around the room and from a variety of angles.

It may be because Toshiba are planning the prices for their whole range including Auto 3D that glasses reliant 3D TVs are very affordable from Toshiba.The fact that they will be first to market with Auto-3D means that they can afford to cut prices on their active shutter TVs without damaging their brand, plus the technology will have little value soon so there is little point trying to preserve value, they are making 3D TV mainstream therefore.

Toshiba 3D TVs

Toshiba offer LCD rather than Plasma 3D TVs but they have been reviewed as some of the best LCD displays rarely suffering from Cross-talk ghosting despite LCDs having a lower frame rate than Plasma meaning that in action scenes in films and in some sport, ghosting occurs where the refresh doesn’t keep up with the shutter speed on the viewer’s glasses.

Toshiba’s first 3D TVs coincided with the first 3D channel to broadcast in the UK, the lack of content previously making 3D TVs a device that would be a hard sell with little to watch. Upscaling 2D content to 3D though adds a lot of extra value and different manufacturers have achieved it to a different extent with some not developing it at all yet. Software must guess how a 2D image should look in 3D and adapt it;it is partly a balancing act between content that looks truly 3 dimensional and content that simply looks distorted. Toshiba have a system that not only upscales 2D content but also they can take 3D broadcast content and upscale it so it is true 3D to the same extent as a Blu-Ray disk. This is because 3D broadcasting currently works on a system where two images are broadcast simultaneously beside each other due to the lack of bandwidth: 3D TVs put these images into a 3D presentation but Toshiba offer the best results with this extra step. Continue reading “Toshiba 3D TVs”

Star Fox 64 3D complete review

Star Fox 64 3D, classic comes back to life. 14 years since it appeared on Nintendo 63. My first question was if it lives up to the original game. I was skeptic about the 3D part, but that soon changed, and I really liked the game.

Star Fox 64 3D is a simulation/shooter game. That is the best way to describe it. You are Fox McCloud and you shoot your way through some intense levels in order to save Lylat System. Those levels are pretty interesting and provide a lot of challenge for you to play the game again. There are some really cool boss fights that require excellent strategic moves in order to win the fight against them.

Star Fox 64 3D

The game branches in different paths and it is up to you where that route will take you. In original series you took one path and there is not much you can do about it. You can only go to next planet that is connected with the path you took but, in new Star Fox 64 3D you get to choose to which planet you go next, which is a nice addition to the game.

Star Fox 63 3D offers you excellent controls. You get to choose between two controlling system. One is by tilting the system, and must admit it works well enough. But it also has some bad sides, like you have to move your body in order to avoid the blur effects of 3D. But, I guess that gives you the opportunity to feel like you are actually driving the star fighter. And there is the traditional control system, you use circle pad and that way you avoid 3D blur. Continue reading “Star Fox 64 3D complete review”

Grand Epic Online (GEO) review by active gamers

When I heard of this game I was a bit skeptic. The reason for that is that I played a lot of them, and none of them got my attention. So, I got on the Grand Epic web site, and tried it. First thing you notice is character creation. You see all those nice graphics and you can’t believe that you will be playing that character (It looks too good to be true).

So, what do we have? There are 4 classes, and you can choose to be male or female (logic). The classes are typical for most RPG based games. It is only they are called different name. So, you have Flower valley which use bow for ranged weapons and can heal. Next one is Shu Mountain which use sword for attacking, and they are something like classic fighters with a possibility to drain mana. Then we have Tianmu Cave, mighty fighters with unmatched fighting skills. They use broadsword and can go to berserk. Last but not least is Herming Mountain, which is typical mages. They use a rod and are very powerful using magic to kill their opponents. When you make a character you go inside one of the 3 servers. There is not much difference, so you can choose any.

Grand Epic Online (GEO)

Graphics:

Once I logged in, I noticed a beautiful looking graphics. It is no match to any client based MMORPG, but it is alluring, and it looks pretty. I am thinking that it would be really hard to optimize the game for browsers if it had amazing graphics. In general it is a standard 2D game with anime elements. Some people could expect more, but I’m really satisfied with it. One thing I would like to add that the game should have been optimized better. Because of that graphics load slow, and you can get blur effects in front of you.

Sound:

Ok, this is the part when you start to ask yourself if you want to play this game, since our ear is a powerful organ, even if we use our eyes to percept mostly everything. But, it is our ear that pulls us to the imaginary, it fuels our imagination. Grand Epic online lacks that because it is limited with few sound effects and poor music. It may not sound that much, but if you play it for few hours it can get really annoying. Continue reading “Grand Epic Online (GEO) review by active gamers”